a few words on Trayvon Martin, Vanessa Kirkland and Kony

It’s not one of the funny ones

but i had some stuff i had to say

no offense

just reasoning

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6 Replies to “a few words on Trayvon Martin, Vanessa Kirkland and Kony”

  1. I wont talk about your hair or the fact that this isnt your usual MooreMayhem video…..but what i will say is that it’s really sad that there’s so many injustice in the world….everyday it becomes present and we the ppl either talk about it, try to protest about it…or simply ignore it. For centuries black people have been rising to the top and in the same breath someone or an organisation tries their best to tear them down…it’s sad, unfair, depressing but what i can say is that the uprising will never stop…while many of us can only protest via social networks etc…i’m glad for the ones who are able to stand outside establishments and make their voices heard…many of us want to retaliate (burn down Police stations, block roads, etc) and whatever we can do that, it has to happen to make oppressors bow down….Jamaica needs help, Africa needs help, heck anywhere in the world that is facing oppression needs help….Thank you for the video, and i hope that others who watch it can make something happen… R.I.P Vanessa Kirkland, Trayvon Martin and many others who suffered and died from profiling and many other injustices

    1. whaapen to me hair?!!!!
      i kid
      but serious thing. there is a place in the world for social media as a part of activism. but i just dont want us to get too comfortable. u know? especially when numbers are small, or things are against us or we are divided. we don’t have the liberty of just sharing. more of us are called to do the work. and i am guilty of click and share and do nothing. i am calling myself out in this video as well. thanks for all your support. truly

  2. These situations are the sad reality that many have accepted as normal, we always fit the “description” we are baby mothers, we are on government assistance and we are lazy. It is heartbreaking because it could be any of us. It could be our brothers, sisters or friend. I live in fear for my brother. He is a black man in a country that has yet to recognize him as a viable part of society. Too much is against him before he steps out the door. How can we become better if the fight that was fought for equality is deemed successful? When will our generation realize that we have a long road to go? When will we stop being 20th century slaves and get the respect we deserve? As you say when we reach this country we are African American and the pre conceived notions against us are astounding. That slap in the face you speak of is beyond the truth. We are from a nation that has issues but the institutionalized discrimination is not as noticeable. It’s too much and my heart is in pieces over our current state. I am scared to have children. I have no answer for my teenager brother when he asks why he is being followed in a store but supposedly we live in a world where we are all equal.

  3. Excellent video and well said all around. All of us are deemed BLACK when we move to developed countries no matter what we’re mixed with — so damn true. I live in Norway and most ethnic Norwegians don’t even want to acknowledge the children of first generation immigrants as Norwegian. They’re given the nationality of their parents as if they weren’t born and raised in Norway. So the black tax is everywhere.

    The only thing I’ll comment on is what you said about Jamaican youth or youth in general who rob and thief (because a stagnant economy drove them to it). I disagree with this. In Jamaican society we’re all given the same lot, you, me and every other Jamaican. I wasn’t born uptown and I wasn’t born downtown either, but even amongst the small middle class it wasn’t a bed of roses. Though my dad is an American, he was never around. It was just my mom, me and my brother. She raised us and she did a darn good job it. My brother never became a thief or a gunman or both. He could’ve because he faced the same challenge and obstacles other Jamaican young men, and people, feels. But he chose not to. I didn’t get pregnant at 16 because I chose not to. There has to be some personal accountability. Choosing a path of crime is a choice. It’s not the system, bad as it is, that make you go out and murder, rape and rob people. EVERY Jamaican lives under the same dire circumstances. Yet some abide by the law of the land whlist other believe they’re entitled to more than they have worked for or more than what everyone else in the country is denied. I strongly believe in due process and do not in any way condone or support the extra judicial killings that alleged to have taken place in Jamaica, but when I hear that a gunman who terrorized citizens with blood and mayhem is shot and killed it’s hard for me to feel any sympathy for him.

  4. I get your racial argument, let me offer my take on this as well:

    ok let me enter this conversation by beginning with Kony campaign; the white man who started the campaign did say it was an experiment and he found a way to use the political behavior of America to drive the campaign. America deems themselves as the Police of the world. He simply called the attention of the Police to the bad man he thought he saw or according to how his black friend pointed it out to them. Police and Nationhood and Nationalism and Racism all these issues had me staring at the video to the point where I could only recognize that it was an excellent marketing ploy. And for the marketing I can say good job dude (whose name i obviously cant remember).

    I too dismissed the video because I idealistically don’t believe in the policing policies of the USA. And I am for Africa’s development as I am for Caribbean development and I am for Self sufficiency and then maybe we can introduce the idea of World Trade. That goes for Jamaica and this re-entering into IMF deal (we living above our means right now and under utilizing resources lets face it…)

    Let me try to be clear here…I too ignored the Kony video business simply because it called on Obama’s snipers and it never looked at Uganda’s policy, just Interpol and FBI and all the other police personnel to tell the world what to do. BUT, I do believe that if the reports are true then Kony should be punished. But how and by whom and what methods should be employed.

    This video felt to me like a campaign, though extremely humanitarian in its ideal, driven by emotion. Africa is a large continent and is riddled with its difficulties much of which is associated with the difficulties of the world it being the “Dark” continent but much of its problems exist because white people are too focused on trying to help Africans (around the world) fix themselves. So the black babies are being re-acculturized in foreign countries and much of the political violence we read in news papers are being enacted on the Continent. Always the white people benefit from the abuse of the continent and give back in charity and charity is no longer synonymous with love as it is called in the bible (which is another problem thrown unto Africa).

    Now lets look at the Caribbean, here we still pay attention to murders committed by Police officers that are blown up by the media. A woman was shot behind her gate in Cassava Piece 32 times 20 of those shots landed in her head, the police’s excuses was that they thought it was some one running from them. 32 bullets for someone who they thought was running, yet Vanessa and her potential is the only rhythm being played by the media.

    The man that killed Martin must of thought himself to be an arm of the police force. My claim five paragraphs into this rant is the issue is with the Police. These people who deem themselves the arm of morality who all over the world exact punishment on Blacks by shooting first and asking questions later.

    Yes Carla black people seem to be expendable across the world but no we should not accept that international aid or support is ok. Not now, when blacks are being robbed of dignity and are being imposed with an identity they have to embrace. If a thief comes into your home removes the most precious items and then returns with blue print to fixing the damage in a way that does not give you the chance to process YOU in a positive light should we listen or run him out. It this thieving ideology and mannerism, this kind of interference that creates hatred, harbours resentment and makes the blacks increasingly aggressive and makes race such a relevant conversation. So many white people out there wish we would just stop pointing fingers, stop making them feel guilty when they are trying to help us. But should not the help offered allow us to tell you more about us and make you understand us instead of handling us according the creatied stereotype and negative viewing that makes us seem dysfunctional.

    I am so skeptical when white people offer help to Africa or the Caribbean man me skeptical all when Oprah she build her school.

    Our court system has made it so that Justice will never happen just a fair trial and a space for arguments.

    In short the world can do without Police policies that inhibit kill or impede our (world) development. Is time we see racism and recognize how blind statements made by wihites such as “I dont see colour” is a new form of racism, as well as the idea of blacks as suffering or evil is in fact very much tied to our disenfranchisement and propagates the kind of policing that perpetuates the murders of boy dress in a particular style with skittles and Ice tea in his hand or black girls with exams in June and women with children walking too late in teh night and a BUSH DON who probably does deserve it ( I want to know why he did it though, cause maybe him need some therapy and a good institution and a straight jacket).

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